What We Can Do About Abuse in the Psychedelic Therapy Community 

The recent explosion of interest in the use of psychedelic drugs to treat PTSD, anxiety, depression, and other conditions has moved faster than the field’s ability to consider and monitor the potential risks involved. Despite the good intentions of many, some professionals have used their authority and the influence of these drugs to abuse, control, manipulate, and steal from clients. While many advocates claim to have implemented safeguards, these have not often been nearly sufficient enough to prevent ongoing harm. Lily Kay Ross and Dave Nickles have done more than anyone to bring these harms into public awareness. This webinar will focus on what they’ve learned and what we can do to prevent further abuse. 

Improving Your Group Therapy Skills 

It is critical that clinicians are skilled in group facilitation principles and techniques, given that treatment of individuals who sexually abuse is typically group-based. In this webinar, Jerry Jennings and Steven Sawyer will discuss the essential qualities of effective treatment groups and group facilitators. They will discuss research, methods, and techniques relevant to group therapy and client motivation. They will then answer your questions about how to improve your clinical practice by facilitating cohesive and dynamic groups.

Addressing Microaggressions in Clinical Practice and the Workplace

Promoting diversity and inclusion has become a top priority in many areas of the criminal justice system. However, microaggressions, which are subtle, covert forms of discrimination, may influence interactions with clients and co-workers, and contribute to detrimental impacts within these environments. Research shows that when microaggressions are directly addressed, the performance, cohesion, and outcomes of workplace teams are enhanced. Therefore, during this interactive webinar interview, participants will learn practical strategies to identify microaggressions and build techniques to improve the culture of clinical settings and the workplace. 

What We Know and What We Need to Know About Incels

ncels (involuntarily celibate men) have been the source of considerable media attention due to a small number of high-profile attacks. Despite the first taking place in 2014, it is only recently that researchers have become interested in this group. Much of this scholarly work has involved analyses of incel forums with little attention paid to incels themselves. Dr. Brandon Sparks is one of the few researchers who has studied incels at an individual level. During this webinar conversation, he will describe who incels are and provide background information about the incel subculture and its impact on society

How to Work with Survivors of Sexual Abuse: A Conversation with Donna Jenson

Donna began her healing journey from the trauma of childhood incest when she was in her early thirties. Along that journey, she has embraced many healing therapies and artistic expressions as well as built a family of choice to make her life worth living. While she has written a book as well as a play and produced a documentary about her experiences, she now helps numerous other activities to assist survivors. In this webinar, she will briefly discuss her healing. She will next offer ideas for working with survivors based on her current activities and programs.

The Good Lives Model: Your Questions Answered

In this webinar Mr. Prescott will briefly describe the model and its implementation with both adults and adolescents. Then he will answer questions submitted during the live event. The webinar will be moderated by Katherine (Katie) Gotch, founder and director of Integrated Clinical and Correctional Services of Portland, OR.

The Influence of Attachment on Adolescents Who Have Sexually Abused: A Conversation with Michael Miner

Dr. Michael Miner, Emeritus Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota, will discuss his research addressing adolescent males who have engaged in sexual violence. The projects — undertaken during Dr. Miner’s time at the Institute of Sexual and Gender Health — are grounded in attachment theory, a psychological conceptualization of how one’s childhood experiences with primary caregivers influence interpersonal relationships and behavior throughout one’s life.